Commonwealth Symbol and Flag
What is the Commonwealth Flag?
 
The Commonwealth Flag consists of the Commonwealth Symbol in gold on a blue background centred on a rectangle.  The symbol consists of a tilted globe, from which 34 spears radiate, forming the letter 'C' for Commonwealth.
 
The flag is flown at Marlborough House, London, the headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat, throughout the year and for a limited period at other venues where Commonwealth Meetings are held or when other Commonwealth events / visits are taking place, for example Commonwealth Heads of Government Meetings. 

Fly-a-Flag for the Commonwealth

 

To herald the amazing and influential family of nations which spans all the continents, a 'Fly-a-Flag' tribute was held on Commonwealth Day 2014.

Hundreds of Commonwealth flags were flown in significant, strategic and eye-catching positions across the UK and beyond - with many expected to flutter their way proudly through to the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow on July 23rd - August 4th.

Bath & North East Somerset took part in the tribute, holding a ceremony in the Chairman of the Council's Room and flying the Commonwealth flag from the Guildhall. 

Click here to read about 'fly-a-flag' at the Guildhall in Bath
Where did the Commonwealth’s symbol originate from?
 

The Commonwealth symbol was originally designed by the Gemini News Service, London in 1972 and approved by the first Commonwealth Secretary-General, Mr Arnold Smith C.H. 

In 1989 a second logo was introduced to appear on official Commonwealth Secretariat publications, and in 1999 a special commemorative logo was produced to mark the 50th Anniversary of the modern Commonwealth. 

In 2000 the previous Secretary-General, Rt Hon Don McKinnon, approved a new design that is now in use in place of the original designs.  This design incorporates the image of the globe used in the original logo and the spears that make up the letter 'C' from the 1989 design.

 

The radiating spears do not represent the number of countries in the Commonwealth but symbolise the many facets of Commonwealth co-operation around the world. The symbol is used on all official documentation and, sometimes in association with other specially developed logos, for the documents and logos of all Commonwealth Meetings.

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